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From the Publisher


"I checked out five books from the library on St. Martin. The Hunter travel guide has more information than all the other book's put together." -- Melissa (Amazon reviewer)

New edition of a proven top-seller, now with color photos and maps throughout. Half-French, half-Dutch, St. Martin is considered the most interesting island in the Caribbean. 475,000 tourists visit by air each year, plus 1.3 million cruise ship passengers, more than all except Cozumel, the Bahamas and the Virgin Islands. Few other guides to these extremely popular islands exist - other than our own St. Martin & St. Barts Alive, a long-time bestseller. Both books are complete, comprehensive travel guides, but the Alive Guide contains extra detail on what to do indoors - dining, shopping, where to stay, nightlife. the Adventure Guide has extra information on what to do outdoors - boating, walking, biking, eco-tours, sailing, wildlife spotting, horseback riding, golf, tennis, windsurfing, fishing. No other all color guides exist. On the Dutch side of St. Martin, everything runs on time, there are big casinos, and great duty-free shopping; on the French side are innumerable world-class restaurants, beautiful girls, nude beaches, and nothing runs on time. St. Barts, next door, is chic and special - the St. Tropez of the Caribbean - with few buildings over one story, no large hotels, and 22 stunning beaches. Both islands are prosperous, upscale, with few poor. Tourists are not pursued and pestered by sellers of knickknacks and tee-shirts, as they are elsewhere in the Caribbean.

About the Author
The Caribbean Islands fascinate veteran travel writer Lynne Sullivan, and she spends several months each year hopping from one to another. As a result, the up-to-date information she passes on to readers in her Adventure Guides is backed by personal experience, and her recommendations fit the needs of travelers with varied interests, budgets and time constraints. When she isn't prowling about the islands, you will find her on the hiking the trails near her home in Sedona, Arizona.

Buy the print edition for for $15.99 at http://www.hunterpublishing.com/index.cfm?Bookide=1-58843-595-4.

You can buy an Amazon Kindle edition for $9.99 at http://www.amazon.com/Martin-Barts-Adventure-Guide-Guides/dp/B001O9C4V4/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1234549657&sr=8-3.
Published: Hunter Publishing on
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